Benchwright Extending Dining Table

Benchwright Extending Dining Table

I had originally seen this table on the Pottery Barn website. My wife and I really liked it but couldn’t afford to pay the $1200 bucks after tax and shipping. it didn’t look to difficult to build so I decided to give it a shot. The wood for the top of the table was almost 3in thick 4.5in wide and 51in long. It was wood from an old pallet that was used to transport a very large air handler. Very heavy dense wood. Since the lengths were only 51 inches I opted to put 2 horizontal pieces on either side to extend the total length to approx 70in. I was inspired by the plans for the benchwright table that I saw on this site but chose to deviate from the plans on here to make it as close to the real thing as possible. I also happen to have access to very thick pieces of hardwood. The only thing I had to buy at lowes were the legs. The legs are 4×4 Douglas fir posts. The top pieces were all glued and screwed together. The ends were also done this way but had a very large lag bolt that held them together to match the pottery barn table. This was originally very rough wood so anything to help get the warp out was used. The legs are set at a 10 degree angle and the table stand 30 in tall. The hardest part of this table was finding the turnbuckle and the threaded rods so it could officially be 99% like the pottery barn table. I also had no idea how hard it was to find left hand threaded anything. I ended up finding everything I need at McMaster.com and my local Fastenal store. To make the brackets that went on either side of the rods i simply bought a piece of 1/8 sheet metal at my local Home depot and cut it to size. They also sold hammered brown paint which gave the metal a worked old look. Once this was all constructed I used two heavy coats of wood conditioner to seal the wood. This was the key to getting the color I wanted. It tells you on the can not to let the wood conditioner dry on the wood but if it does, when you apply the stain you get a 100% consistent color. Worked wonders. It almost felt like I was cheating. I used a water based condition and stained it with rustoleums “dark walnut” stain. Finished it with 5 coats of minwax semi gloss. I only did 5 coats because I was brushing it on and had trouble getting the bubbles out of it. In the final picture it looks much shinier then it is in person. The last picture of when it was still in my garage is a better indication of the final finish. I have a boat load of additional picture, so if you have any questions or want to see more pictures of how it was constructed, shoot me a message. Thanks!
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Benchwright Extending Dining Table

Inspired by the spirited, industrial character of an early 20th-century work table, the Benchwright Extending Dining Table provides a bold backdrop for creative entertaining. Grooves and saw marks on the wood’s surface create the look of salvaged lumber, and oversized bolts on the legs and tabletop add to its rustic feel. Two drop-in leaves allow seating for a large gathering.
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Benchwright Extending Dining Table

With its rustic and industrial design, the Benchwright Fixed Dining Table evokes the feel of an early 20th century work table. Grooves and saw marks create the look of salvaged lumber, and oversized bolts on the legs and surface add to its historic style. Its solid look makes it easy to pair with a range of dining chairs.
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Benchwright Extending Dining Table

Author Notes: While I know it’s still July, and summer for most everyone else, yesterday, while helping out at the Momplex , I found myself shivering all bundled up.  And this morning, the snow line dropped on the mountains.  Those mountains are like a giant clock, ticking with a dropping snow line, reminding us that winter is coming very soon. But not everyone is worried about that. I shiver just looking at that! And it occurred to me that as much as we cringe to think of it, fall is just around the corner. And with fall comes my most favorite of Holidays, Thanksgiving.  What better excuse to build a farmhouse table?  We of course have lots of table plans, but when I saw the Reclaimed Wood Benchwright Farmhouse Table from Pottery Barn, I just HAD to draw you up a plan.  So beautiful! The base is sized for a five foot long iron pipe, available at most home improvement stores in the plumbing aisles.  There’s tons of iron fitting that you could use to “dress” the table up with.
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Benchwright Extending Dining Table

While I know it’s still July, and summer for most everyone else, yesterday, while helping out at the Momplex , I found myself shivering all bundled up.  And this morning, the snow line dropped on the mountains.  Those mountains are like a giant clock, ticking with a dropping snow line, reminding us that winter is coming very soon. But not everyone is worried about that. I shiver just looking at that! And it occurred to me that as much as we cringe to think of it, fall is just around the corner. And with fall comes my most favorite of Holidays, Thanksgiving.  What better excuse to build a farmhouse table?  We of course have lots of table plans, but when I saw the Reclaimed Wood Benchwright Farmhouse Table from Pottery Barn, I just HAD to draw you up a plan.  So beautiful! The base is sized for a five foot long iron pipe, available at most home improvement stores in the plumbing aisles.  There’s tons of iron fitting that you could use to “dress” the table up with.
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Benchwright Extending Dining Table

Inspired by the industrial character of a 19th-century worktable, our Benchwright Pedestal Dining Table provides a bold backdrop for creative entertaining. Grooves and saw marks on the wood’s surface create the look of salvaged lumber, adding to its rustic beauty.
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Benchwright Extending Dining Table

Awesome table. I just hope I can find some 3″ thick lumber without breaking the bank! It looks like you attached the legs by putting 2 bolts through the legs into the small apron on the short ends of the table. It also looks like you might have also put in some pocket holes on the inside of the legs, going straight down into the underneath of the table boards. Is that right? I am just wondering how sturdy it is, since it’s such a heavy table.
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Hi Nathan, Awesome table. I just hope I can find some 3″ thick lumber without breaking the bank! It looks like you attached the legs by putting 2 bolts through the legs into the small apron on the short ends of the table. It also looks like you might have also put in some pocket holes on the inside of the legs, going straight down into the underneath of the table boards. Is that right? I am just wondering how sturdy it is, since it’s such a heavy table. Thanks! Lea
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This island looks like a table that’s had its legs extended 6″. This table-like island has no shelving or storage below but is mixed with counter-height, backless stools and two pendants overhead. Tip: Standard table height is 30″-32″, standard counter height is 36″. Bar height is 39″-42″.
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Because of the change in grain direction, breadboards typically stand out, but with carefully finishing techniques they can be made to blend in with the rest of the table. Browse photos of farm tables in dining rooms.
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I have to tell you . . . I drew this plan up a while back, but just couldn’t post it quite yet because I didn’t feel it met Farmhouse Table requirement #1 – STURDY. But after adding the 2×6 aprons, this is going to be a heavy and sturdy table. Thanks for commenting, it’s always good to hear from owners of the pieces that inspire us!
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Ana White replied on Wed, 2011-07-20 14:50 Permalink I have to tell you . . . I I have to tell you . . . I drew this plan up a while back, but just couldn’t post it quite yet because I didn’t feel it met Farmhouse Table requirement #1 – STURDY. But after adding the 2×6 aprons, this is going to be a heavy and sturdy table. Thanks for commenting, it’s always good to hear from owners of the pieces that inspire us! Log in or register to post comments
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Yes, you are correct. I attached the legs with 2, 6inch lag bolts. I pre-drilled them at the correct angle (which I eye balled) and ratcheted them in. I was a little worried about them being sturdy enough so I went ahead and made a few pocket holes and secured it that was also. The legs overall are very sturdy. The table probably weights 150-200lbs and I was able to pick up one side of it only holding onto one leg. Table doesn’t wobble at all. The cross member holding the legs together also helped pull everything together.