Korean Dining Table

Korean Dining Table

Politeness is very important to Koreans and there is a lot of emphasis placed on sharing meals and drinks. Although some of the older traditions have relaxed in recent years, this list of Korean table manners includes etiquette still in use today. 01 of 14 Wait to be seated Images By Tang Ming Tung/Stone/Getty Images Wait for the oldest person/people to sit down first before you take a seat at the table. 02 of 14 Before you begin Before you eat, especially at someone's home, it's polite to say that you are looking forward to the meal. In Korean, people say Jalmukesumneda (I will eat well). 03 of 14 Beginning the meal Wait for the oldest person/people to lift their spoon or chopsticks first before you start eating. 04 of 14 During the meal Don't blow your nose at the table. Ever. Continue to 5 of 14 below. 05 of 14 Don’t rush or linger Try to eat at the same pace as everyone else, especially the elders. 06 of 14 Soup and rice bowls During the meal, don't hold the bowl of soup or rice (as you might do in other Asian countries like China or Japan). 07 of 14 Double dipping Korean meals have many communal side dishes, so don't dig into the bowls and touch a lot of the other food while you're taking your own. 08 of 14 Refilling your glass Always pour drinks for others first, especially for those senior to you. Continue to 9 of 14 below. 09 of 14 Offers of alcohol It's not considered polite to refuse an alcoholic drink offered to you, especially from an elder. 10 of 14 Accepting dishes or drinks When someone senior pours a drink for you, hold out your cup with both hands to accept (this also holds true for someone passing you a side dish or something else at the table). 11 of 14 Pouring drinks Afton Almaraz/Taxi/Getty Images When you pour for someone senior to you, place your other hand lightly under your pouring hand or under your opposite elbow. 12 of 14 Placement of utensils on table Don't stick your chopsticks straight up into your bowl because that resembles traditional Korean ancestor ceremonies. When you're done, utensils go back on the table. Continue to 13 of 14 below. 13 of 14 Don’t waste food Don't take so much food that you can't finish, as that is considered wasteful. 14 of 14 Acknowledging your hosts If someone has hosted you in their home or treated you to a meal out, it is customary to acknowledge your thanks after the meal. In Korean, people say masegaemugusuyo (I ate well). Read More
korean dining table 1

Korean Dining Table

Politeness is very important to Koreans and there is a lot of emphasis placed on sharing meals and drinks. Although some of the older traditions have relaxed in recent years, this list of Korean table manners includes etiquette still in use today. 01 of 14 Wait to be seated Images By Tang Ming Tung/Stone/Getty Images Wait for the oldest person/people to sit down first before you take a seat at the table. 02 of 14 Before you begin Before you eat, especially at someone's home, it's polite to say that you are looking forward to the meal. In Korean, people say Jalmukesumneda (I will eat well). 03 of 14 Beginning the meal Wait for the oldest person/people to lift their spoon or chopsticks first before you start eating. 04 of 14 During the meal Don't blow your nose at the table. Ever. Continue to 5 of 14 below. 05 of 14 Don’t rush or linger Try to eat at the same pace as everyone else, especially the elders. 06 of 14 Soup and rice bowls During the meal, don't hold the bowl of soup or rice (as you might do in other Asian countries like China or Japan). 07 of 14 Double dipping Korean meals have many communal side dishes, so don't dig into the bowls and touch a lot of the other food while you're taking your own. 08 of 14 Refilling your glass Always pour drinks for others first, especially for those senior to you. Continue to 9 of 14 below. 09 of 14 Offers of alcohol It's not considered polite to refuse an alcoholic drink offered to you, especially from an elder. 10 of 14 Accepting dishes or drinks When someone senior pours a drink for you, hold out your cup with both hands to accept (this also holds true for someone passing you a side dish or something else at the table). 11 of 14 Pouring drinks Afton Almaraz/Taxi/Getty Images When you pour for someone senior to you, place your other hand lightly under your pouring hand or under your opposite elbow. 12 of 14 Placement of utensils on table Don't stick your chopsticks straight up into your bowl because that resembles traditional Korean ancestor ceremonies. When you're done, utensils go back on the table. Continue to 13 of 14 below. 13 of 14 Don’t waste food Don't take so much food that you can't finish, as that is considered wasteful. 14 of 14 Acknowledging your hosts If someone has hosted you in their home or treated you to a meal out, it is customary to acknowledge your thanks after the meal. In Korean, people say masegaemugusuyo (I ate well).
korean dining table 2

Korean Dining Table

01 of 14 Wait to be seated Images By Tang Ming Tung/Stone/Getty Images Wait for the oldest person/people to sit down first before you take a seat at the table. 02 of 14 Before you begin Before you eat, especially at someone's home, it's polite to say that you are looking forward to the meal. In Korean, people say Jalmukesumneda (I will eat well). 03 of 14 Beginning the meal Wait for the oldest person/people to lift their spoon or chopsticks first before you start eating. 04 of 14 During the meal Don't blow your nose at the table. Ever. Continue to 5 of 14 below. 05 of 14 Don’t rush or linger Try to eat at the same pace as everyone else, especially the elders. 06 of 14 Soup and rice bowls During the meal, don't hold the bowl of soup or rice (as you might do in other Asian countries like China or Japan). 07 of 14 Double dipping Korean meals have many communal side dishes, so don't dig into the bowls and touch a lot of the other food while you're taking your own. 08 of 14 Refilling your glass Always pour drinks for others first, especially for those senior to you. Continue to 9 of 14 below. 09 of 14 Offers of alcohol It's not considered polite to refuse an alcoholic drink offered to you, especially from an elder. 10 of 14 Accepting dishes or drinks When someone senior pours a drink for you, hold out your cup with both hands to accept (this also holds true for someone passing you a side dish or something else at the table). 11 of 14 Pouring drinks Afton Almaraz/Taxi/Getty Images When you pour for someone senior to you, place your other hand lightly under your pouring hand or under your opposite elbow. 12 of 14 Placement of utensils on table Don't stick your chopsticks straight up into your bowl because that resembles traditional Korean ancestor ceremonies. When you're done, utensils go back on the table. Continue to 13 of 14 below. 13 of 14 Don’t waste food Don't take so much food that you can't finish, as that is considered wasteful. 14 of 14 Acknowledging your hosts If someone has hosted you in their home or treated you to a meal out, it is customary to acknowledge your thanks after the meal. In Korean, people say masegaemugusuyo (I ate well).
korean dining table 3

Korean Dining Table

It’s a lot of fun, and delicious, but it’s different from how Koreans typically eat at home. You have been cooking Korean food for a while, so if you really want to serve a Korean table and introduce your Korean food to anyone, you should learn how to serve it homestyle, not restaurant style.
korean dining table 4

Korean Dining Table

Hi Maangchi, Thank you for showing the right table-setting! I’ll certainly keep that in mind when taking photos of our dinner at home next time. The experience that bap arrived last we had only once at one of the Korean restaurants here in Munich. A Korean friend of ours was really furious about that! 😉 Bye, Sanne.
korean dining table 5

Korean Dining Table

Dining Room Gather for the food. Stay for the stories. Getting them to the table is easy. So our dining furniture is designed to help with the hard part – keeping them there. Because when the chairs are comfy and the table is just the right size, everyone will be happy to stay for a while (even if there’s no dessert). Dining tables Up to 4 seats, Up to 6 seats, Up to 10 seats, Extendable tables, Wall-mounted tables, Dining table tops & underframes Dining chairs Dining chair underframes & seat shells, Dining chairs, Upholstered chairs, Foldable chairs, Chair covers
korean dining table 6

Korean Dining Table

For many people, their first experience with Korean food is in a Korean restaurant. Usually it goes like this: they sit down and order, and soon some side dishes come out.
korean dining table 7

Korean Dining Table

I’ve seen many foreigners overwhelmed when they first eat Korean food homestyle. They feel there are too many dishes. The thing is other than bap and main dish, you are not expected to eat all of it. Side dishes(banchan) are often served for free at resturants and they throw away the left overs. At home though, leftovers are usually put back into storage. Most Korean food is fermented, pickled or marinated and are good for keeping long period. For every meal mothers usually just cook rice and main dish. The rest? they are all in refrigerator and we take out the amount we are going to eat for the meal. That is why banchan is normally made and sold in large batch.