Paul Mccobb Dining Table

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

Paul McCobb, USA (1917-1969) Learn More About Paul McCobb Paul McCobb, USA (1917-1969) You could call Paul McCobb a man of parts. As a furniture designer, his work combined the attributes of many of his now better-known peers. Like Bauhaus designers such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, his furniture had purity of form and line. Like the designs of Florence Knoll and George Nelson and his associates, McCobb’s work was efficient and purposeful. And even like George Nakashima, he was adept at interpreting traditional forms, in particular those of chairs, for the 20th century.      More than any other designer beside Russel Wright, with his ubiquitous ceramic tableware, McCobb was arguably responsible for the introduction of modern design into middle-class American households — if for no other reason than that he designed the 1952 set for the original Today show. McCobb also designed cohesive lines of furnishings, such as his best-known “Planner Group,” that gave homes an instant “look.” McCobb designed for several companies, most notably Directional, the New York firm that also produced designs by other legends, such as Paul Evans and Vladimir Kagan.      The signal aesthetic attribute of McCobb designs is that he completely forsook ornament — his pieces have no flourishes. And yet, because they are honest — the chairs, desks and tables are made of solid wood, usually maple or birch, often paired with frames and legs of wrought iron; the cabinets are traditionally scaled; the seating pieces have historic antecedents such as the Windsor chair — McCobb’s work has warmth and presence. As you can see from the offerings on these pages, Paul McCobb designs are the pin-striped suit, or the little black dress, of a décor: an essential.
paul mccobb dining table 1

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

Paul McCobb, USA (1917-1969) You could call Paul McCobb a man of parts. As a furniture designer, his work combined the attributes of many of his now better-known peers. Like Bauhaus designers such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, his furniture had purity of form and line. Like the designs of Florence Knoll and George Nelson and his associates, McCobb’s work was efficient and purposeful. And even like George Nakashima, he was adept at interpreting traditional forms, in particular those of chairs, for the 20th century.      More than any other designer beside Russel Wright, with his ubiquitous ceramic tableware, McCobb was arguably responsible for the introduction of modern design into middle-class American households — if for no other reason than that he designed the 1952 set for the original Today show. McCobb also designed cohesive lines of furnishings, such as his best-known “Planner Group,” that gave homes an instant “look.” McCobb designed for several companies, most notably Directional, the New York firm that also produced designs by other legends, such as Paul Evans and Vladimir Kagan.      The signal aesthetic attribute of McCobb designs is that he completely forsook ornament — his pieces have no flourishes. And yet, because they are honest — the chairs, desks and tables are made of solid wood, usually maple or birch, often paired with frames and legs of wrought iron; the cabinets are traditionally scaled; the seating pieces have historic antecedents such as the Windsor chair — McCobb’s work has warmth and presence. As you can see from the offerings on these pages, Paul McCobb designs are the pin-striped suit, or the little black dress, of a décor: an essential.
paul mccobb dining table 2

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

You could call Paul McCobb a man of parts. As a furniture designer, his work combined the attributes of many of his now better-known peers. Like Bauhaus designers such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, his furniture had purity of form and line. Like the designs of Florence Knoll and George Nelson and his associates, McCobb’s work was efficient and purposeful. And even like George Nakashima, he was adept at interpreting traditional forms, in particular those of chairs, for the 20th century.      More than any other designer beside Russel Wright, with his ubiquitous ceramic tableware, McCobb was arguably responsible for the introduction of modern design into middle-class American households — if for no other reason than that he designed the 1952 set for the original Today show. McCobb also designed cohesive lines of furnishings, such as his best-known “Planner Group,” that gave homes an instant “look.” McCobb designed for several companies, most notably Directional, the New York firm that also produced designs by other legends, such as Paul Evans and Vladimir Kagan.      The signal aesthetic attribute of McCobb designs is that he completely forsook ornament — his pieces have no flourishes. And yet, because they are honest — the chairs, desks and tables are made of solid wood, usually maple or birch, often paired with frames and legs of wrought iron; the cabinets are traditionally scaled; the seating pieces have historic antecedents such as the Windsor chair — McCobb’s work has warmth and presence. As you can see from the offerings on these pages, Paul McCobb designs are the pin-striped suit, or the little black dress, of a décor: an essential.
paul mccobb dining table 3

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

About Paul McCobb View Profile » Paul McCobb (American, 1917-1969) was an American furniture and industrial designer closely associated with mid-century modern design. After serving in the army as a private, McCobb garnered considerable acclaim working as a design and decorating consultant for Martin Feinman’s Modernage Furniture in New York City. His furnishings, which include a number of various household items, were notable for their sleek, economical style and affordability. His first line, Planmaker furniture, was met with considerable success, earmarking a standard for subsequent mid-century modern designers and collectors. Interested in consigning works by Paul McCobb? Learn more »
paul mccobb dining table 4

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

Paul McCobb American born and bred, Paul McCobb was a former window dresser with no formal design experience who had a brief career of designing some of the most unusual, enduring and coveted Mid-Century furniture. His “Planner Group” line was a popular and much copied collection—the pieces he is most famous for. Want a true mid-century collector’s item? Bring home a vintage McCobb dresser, a used credenza or a stunning set of dining chairs. Following Follow This Search
paul mccobb dining table 5

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

SO you missed the boat on Russel Wright, Gustav Stickley, Heywood-Wakefield and T. H. Robsjohn-Gibbings.But there are still affordable pieces around by another big-name 20th-century furniture designer, Paul McCobb.His style was pure 50’s: his work was mass-produced, so there was a lot of it around. There still is, at flea markets and contemporary-antiques stores, and his style has undergone a resurgence in popularity.McCobb was one of the most prolific of the mid-century designers. His style was contemporary enough to be modern, but it never burst the bounds of middle-class respectability. While Heywood-Wakefield strayed into atomic-age fantasies, McCobb offered playful takes on traditional forms with hints of Scandinavian craftsmanship and International Style clarity. Continue reading the main story
paul mccobb dining table 6

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

     More than any other designer beside Russel Wright, with his ubiquitous ceramic tableware, McCobb was arguably responsible for the introduction of modern design into middle-class American households — if for no other reason than that he designed the 1952 set for the original Today show. McCobb also designed cohesive lines of furnishings, such as his best-known “Planner Group,” that gave homes an instant “look.” McCobb designed for several companies, most notably Directional, the New York firm that also produced designs by other legends, such as Paul Evans and Vladimir Kagan.
paul mccobb dining table 7

Paul Mccobb Dining Table

     The signal aesthetic attribute of McCobb designs is that he completely forsook ornament — his pieces have no flourishes. And yet, because they are honest — the chairs, desks and tables are made of solid wood, usually maple or birch, often paired with frames and legs of wrought iron; the cabinets are traditionally scaled; the seating pieces have historic antecedents such as the Windsor chair — McCobb’s work has warmth and presence. As you can see from the offerings on these pages, Paul McCobb designs are the pin-striped suit, or the little black dress, of a décor: an essential.
paul mccobb dining table 8

American born and bred, Paul McCobb was a former window dresser with no formal design experience who had a brief career of designing some of the most unusual, enduring and coveted Mid-Century furniture. His “Planner Group” line was a popular and much copied collection—the pieces he is most famous for. Want a true mid-century collector’s item? Bring home a vintage McCobb dresser, a used credenza or a stunning set of dining chairs.
paul mccobb dining table 9

Alex Shear, a collector and expert in 20th-century design, said of McCobb: “He was America’s decorator. You couldn’t make a mistake buying Paul McCobb furniture for your 50’s ranch house.”

So why the seemingly sudden rediscovery of McCobb? Paul Jaffe, a psychotherapist, has been quietly replacing chintz and country antiques with McCobb and Robjohns-Gibbings in his carriage house in the East Village. He said the reason he liked the furniture was because of the memories it evoked.
paul mccobb dining table 11

You could call Paul McCobb a man of parts. As a furniture designer, his work combined the attributes of many of his now better-known peers. Like Bauhaus designers such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, his furniture had purity of form and line. Like the designs of Florence Knoll and George Nelson and his associates, McCobb’s work was efficient and purposeful. And even like George Nakashima, he was adept at interpreting traditional forms, in particular those of chairs, for the 20th century.